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Indications

Prevention of Cardiovascular Events: In adults with established cardiovascular disease, Repatha® is indicated to reduce the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and coronary revascularization. Read more

Primary Hyperlipidemia (including Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia): Repatha® is indicated as an adjunct to diet, alone or in combination with other lipid-lowering therapies (e.g., stains, ezetimibe), for the treatment of adults with primary hyperlipidemia to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C).

Repatha® added to a statin is proven to reduce the risk of another MI1

Repatha® added to a statin is proven to reduce the risk of another MI1

43%
OF PATIENTS

who have had a CV event* had at
least
1 more within 2 years2

*A CV event during follow-up was defined as hospitalization
for MI,
ischemic stroke, CABG, PCI, UA, TIA, or HF.

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Despite treatment with statins
and/or ezetimibe...

68%

of people in the United
States
with established CVD
have LDL-C ≥70 mg/dL3

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Even with moderate- or high-intensity statins,
patients like Maria need more to reduce their
risk of future MI.

RECENT MI
  • Went to the ER with NSTE-ACS, confirmed as NSTEMI. Underwent PCI within 24 hours and was admitted to the hospital
  • LDL-C prior to MI: 119 mg/dL
DISCHARGE
  • Sent home with dietary/lifestyle recommendations
  • Prescribed moderate statin therapy (maximum tolerated dose)
MEDICAL HISTORY
  • History of hypertension
  • History of prior STEMI 3 years ago; managed with PCI
  • TC=170 mg/dL
CURRENT LDL-C
  • 92 mg/dL

GUIDELINES RECOGNIZE
THE NEED TO DO MORE FOR
VERY HIGH-RISK PATIENTS

AHA/ACC guidelines recommend the
addition of a PCSK9 inhibitor like
Repatha® to
further lower LDL-C and
associated CV risk

Very high-risk includes a history of multiple major ASCVD
events or 1
major ASCVD event and multiple high-risk
conditions.4

Class l: Add ezetimibe to maximal statin before adding
PCSK9 inhibitor;
Class lla: If on clinically judged maximal
LDL-C-lowering therapy and
LDL-C ≥70 mg/dL, or
non-HDL-C ≥100 mg/dL, adding a PCSK9 inhibitor
is
reasonable.4

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She's counting on you.

For your recent MI
patients and
everyone
counting on them,
add Repatha®.

Learn about Repatha®

Indications:

  • Prevention of Cardiovascular Events: In adults with established cardiovascular disease, Repatha® is indicated to reduce the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and coronary revascularization.

  • Primary Hyperlipidemia (including Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia): Repatha® is indicated as an adjunct to diet, alone or in combination with other lipid-lowering therapies (e.g., statins, ezetimibe), for the treatment of adults with primary hyperlipidemia to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C).

Important Safety Information

  • Contraindication: Repatha® is contraindicated in patients with a history of a serious hypersensitivity reaction to Repatha®. Serious hypersensitivity reactions including angioedema have occurred in patients treated with Repatha®.

  • Allergic Reactions: Hypersensitivity reactions (e.g. angioedema, rash, urticaria) have been reported in patients treated with Repatha®, including some that led to discontinuation of therapy. If signs or symptoms of serious allergic reactions occur, discontinue treatment with Repatha®, treat according to the standard of care, and monitor until signs and symptoms resolve.

  • Adverse Reactions in Primary Hyperlipidemia, Including HeFH: The most common adverse reactions (>5% of patients treated with Repatha® and occurring more frequently than placebo) were: nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory tract infection, influenza, back pain, and injection site reactions.

    From a pool of the 52-week trial and seven 12-week trials: Local injection site reactions occurred in 3.2% and 3.0% of Repatha®-treated and placebo-treated patients, respectively. The most common injection site reactions were erythema, pain, and bruising.

    Allergic reactions occurred in 5.1% and 4.7% of Repatha®-treated and placebo-treated patients, respectively. The most common allergic reactions were rash (1.0% versus 0.5% for Repatha® and placebo, respectively), eczema (0.4% versus 0.2%), erythema (0.4% versus 0.2%), and urticaria (0.4% versus 0.1%).

  • Adverse Reactions in the Cardiovascular Outcomes Trial: The most common adverse reactions (>5% of patients treated with Repatha® and occurring more frequently than placebo) were: diabetes mellitus (8.8% Repatha®, 8.2% placebo), nasopharyngitis (7.8% Repatha®, 7.4% placebo), and upper respiratory tract infection (5.1% Repatha®, 4.8% placebo).

    Among the 16,676 patients without diabetes mellitus at baseline, the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus during the trial was 8.1% in patients assigned to Repatha® compared with 7.7% in those assigned to placebo.

  • Immunogenicity: Repatha® is a human monoclonal antibody. As with all therapeutic proteins, there is a potential for immunogenicity with Repatha®.

 

Please see full Prescribing Information.

 

AHA/ACC=American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology; ASCVD=atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease; CABG=coronary artery bypass grafting; CV=cardiovascular; CVD=cardiovascular disease; ER=emergency room; HDL-C=high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; HF=heart failure; LDL-C=low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; MI=myocardial infarction; NSTE-ACS=non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome; NSTEMI=non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction; PCI=percutaneous coronary intervention; PCSK9=proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9; STEMI=ST-elevation myocardial infarction; TC=total cholesterol; TIA=transient ischemic attack; UA=unstable angina.

References: 1. Repatha® (evolocumab) prescribing information, Amgen. 2. Punekar R, Fox KM, Richhariya A, et al. Burden of first and recurrent cardiovascular events among patients with hyperlipidemia. Clin Cardiol. 2015;38:483-491. 3. Data on file, Amgen; 2018. 4. Grundy SM, Stone NJ, Bailey AL, et al. 2018 AHA/ACC/AACVPR/AAPA/ABC/ACPM/ADA/AGS/APhA/ASPC/NLA/PCNA Guideline on the management of blood cholesterol: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2018: doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2018.11.003

 

See More

Important Safety Information and Indications

Contraindication: Repatha® is contraindicated in patients with a history of a serious hypersensitivity reaction to Repatha®. Serious hypersensitivity reactions including angioedema have occurred in patients treated with Repatha®.

Indications:

Prevention of Cardiovascular Events: In adults with established cardiovascular disease, Repatha® is indicated to reduce the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and coronary revascularization.

Primary Hyperlipidemia (including Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia): Repatha® is indicated as an adjunct to diet, alone or in combination with other lipid-lowering therapies (e.g., statins, ezetimibe), for the treatment of adults with primary hyperlipidemia to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C).

Important Safety Information

Contraindication: Repatha® is contraindicated in patients with a history of a serious hypersensitivity reaction to Repatha®. Serious hypersensitivity reactions including angioedema have occurred in patients treated with Repatha®.

Allergic Reactions: Hypersensitivity reactions (e.g. angioedema, rash, urticaria) have been reported in patients treated with Repatha®, including some that led to discontinuation of therapy. If signs or symptoms of serious allergic reactions occur, discontinue treatment with Repatha®, treat according to the standard of care, and monitor until signs and symptoms resolve.

Adverse Reactions in Primary Hyperlipidemia, Including HeFH: The most common adverse reactions (>5% of patients treated with Repatha® and occurring more frequently than placebo) were: nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory tract infection, influenza, back pain, and injection site reactions.

From a pool of the 52-week trial and seven 12-week trials: Local injection site reactions occurred in 3.2% and 3.0% of Repatha®-treated and placebo-treated patients, respectively. The most common injection site reactions were erythema, pain, and bruising.

Allergic reactions occurred in 5.1% and 4.7% of Repatha®-treated and placebo-treated patients, respectively. The most common allergic reactions were rash (1.0% versus 0.5% for Repatha® and placebo, respectively), eczema (0.4% versus 0.2%), erythema (0.4% versus 0.2%), and urticaria (0.4% versus 0.1%).

Adverse Reactions in the Cardiovascular Outcomes Trial: The most common adverse reactions (>5% of patients treated with Repatha® and occurring more frequently than placebo) were: diabetes mellitus (8.8% Repatha®, 8.2% placebo), nasopharyngitis (7.8% Repatha®, 7.4% placebo), and upper respiratory tract infection (5.1% Repatha®, 4.8% placebo).

Among the 16,676 patients without diabetes mellitus at baseline, the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus during the trial was 8.1% in patients assigned to Repatha® compared with 7.7% in those assigned to placebo.

Immunogenicity: Repatha® is a human monoclonal antibody. As with all therapeutic proteins, there is a potential for immunogenicity with Repatha®.

 

Please see full Prescribing Information.